How to Raise a Miracle: Three Words To Transform Your Parenting

She was unlike any other mother I’d ever met. Her mile-wide smile made her molasses eyes sparkle. The labor and delivery of her son (her fourth child of eleven) took place in a mosquito-infested swamp. She was married to one man along with 11 other wives.

Her name is Eseza and she’s one of the most amazing moms I’ve ever had the privilege to meet.

day 3 (27)My husband and I boarded three planes, a subway, a van, and two cars to interview our Ugandan friend, Pastor Elijah Sebuchu, and visit his mother’s remote East African village. Before entering her cinder block home we walked past her “kitchen,” a fire and some pots set up under a crude palm-roofed hut.

Eseza welcomed us with hugs and bottles of water as if we were royalty. I turned on my digital recorder to begin the interview for the book I’m writing about Elijah, who sat close by translating her Luganda words into English.

day 3 (16)My heart ached as she spoke of the utter horrors of raising a child in the bush country of Uganda. Starvation. Disease. No medical care. Tribal massacres that forced her and her tiny children to flee their huts and sleep in a jungle creeping with machete-wielding soldiers, venomous snakes, and hungry tigers.

Listening to Eseza describe Elijah’s childhood was surreal, especially after getting to know him. I glanced over at the tall, polished, articulate, intelligent man beside her. A man who:

  • pastors one of Uganda’s fastest growing churches (270 church plants)
  • presented at the 2006 Global Summit on AIDS and The Church at the invitation of best-selling author, Dr. Rick Warren.
  • hosts a weekly radio talk show that reaches approximately 30 million Ugandans
  • serves as Founder and President of Hands of Love Foundation, an international organization that supports, empowers, and educates 1,800 of tomorrow’s finest Christian leaders
  • serves as Founder and Leader of a youth empowerment conference in Uganda that drew a whopping 7,150 delegates last year

The crazy contrast between this world changer sitting across from me and the terrible awful that permeated his childhood was perplexing. It made me wonder, and perhaps you’re wondering too as mother’s day approaches. And so I asked.

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“What’s the secret? How did you raise this internationally known man of God who is raising up pebble throwers and saving lives every day? How does a mother raise such a miracle?”

The next 20 minutes of our interview ranks among the top ten most impactful conversations of my life. This mom, who had endured tribal violence, starvation,  depression, torture from her husband’s wives, witchcraft, losing children to malaria, you name it … This ferociously strong, exceedingly exceptional woman proceeded to share other-worldly mothering wisdom unlike anything I’d ever heard. To this day, it is some of the most sacred parenting advice I’ve been given. And you’ll have to buy my book to hear all of it 🙂

My brain and recorder had collected dozens of golden nuggets for my book and I was full. Almost satisfied. But I had one final question before placing a period at the end of our interview.

“What’s the thing that mattered most in raising Elijah?”

She sat and stared in silence and we waited.

“I always prayed to God and laid hands on Elijah asking God to give him wisdom, patience, love, kindness, generosity. I always laid hands on him and spoke into his life, ‘you are going to be a national leader, touch many lives, be a giver, be generous.’ I always advised him and prayed for him. But if you want a person to receive what you are speaking to him you need to love that person. And I loved him most.”

A huge lump formed in my throat as I heard her say those three words.

“Love them most.”

day 3 (13)The glue that bonded all her pebble-throwing efforts to shape Elijah into a powerful man of Godly character was love. Love trumps all.

“If I speak with human eloquence and angelic ecstasy but don’t love, I’m nothing but the creaking of a rusty gate. If I speak God’s Word with power, revealing all His mysteries and making everything plain as day, and if I have faith that says to a mountain, ‘Jump,’ and it jumps, but I don’t love, I’m nothing. If I give everything I own to the poor and even go to the stake to be burned as a martyr, but I don’t love, I’ve gotten nowhere. So, no matter what I say, what I believe, and what I do, I’m bankrupt without love” 1 Corinthians 13:1-3.

“Love them most.” It’s my mother’s day gift to you as you endeavor to raise children who put love into action. As for me, if I pray eloquent, powerful prayers for my children and speak all kinds of truth I learned at Bible Study, but nag and guilt them, and stare at my iPhone more than I look into their eyes, then my words are fingernails on the chalk board of their hearts. None of us gains anything. We are all bankrupt. It’s all held together with love. Not love the thought, but love the verb.

Need a mother’s day gift? Please consider honoring your mom and Eseza with a donation to help open Hands of Love’s infant orphanage which was built and named in her honor. These fabulous young pebble throwers are making it easy for you. Just watch the video and consider throwing this very significant pebble to save little lives in Uganda.Screenshot 2016-05-03 16.39.15

Click here to see some amazing pebble throwers in action!

The Aroma of Christ

We brought Uganda home on our feet. We’ve rinsed and scrubbed, yet our shoes still wear the orange-red soil that daily crept in between our toes as we served as missionaries. There are shadows of terracotta hands on our white t-shirts. The smell of burning trash and charcoal clings to our hair.

DSC_0385A few days ago, dozens of joy-ridden children sat on our laps, curiously fingered our long wavy hair, squeezed our hands, and searched our eyes for a look—one you-are-loved look. To be honest, as they snuggled in close, their scent was often pungent. But the overwhelming aroma that lingered after our time together was that of Jesus Christ. The smell that brings life in a place where death runs rampant.

DSC_0339There are two Hands of Love schools in Uganda that care for more than 1,600 abandoned and orphaned children. After spending several days at the more developed school near the big city of Kampala, it was time to trek to the second location. The Namadhi orphanage, located in the remote Kayunge district of Uganda, is way out there. It took our team nearly five hours to reach it.

As the Hands of Love van rattled and heaved along the bumpy, unpaved roads carved by the heavy downpours of the rainy season, we took in the unusual scenery. We noticed mud and wattle huts, half-clothed children playing with cardboard boxes, women carrying fire wood and bananas on their heads, and mosques.DSC_0411

Every four to ten kilometers or so, a concrete building with turrets appeared. The turrets were crowned with the unmistakable crescent moon and star of Islam. The building of these rural mosques is funded by Islamic supporters in the middle east whose investment includes a well. Thirsty villagers, who might otherwise walk miles each day to gather water, are offered a shortcut: convert to Islam and receive full access to the well. How ironic. The very source that brings them physical life is used to rob them of eternal life through Jesus Christ.

DSC_0450But at Hands of Love Namadhi, the smell of life pervades the air. Joy surprised our team at every turn. Children chanting “wel-o-come” greeted us with personalized signs and waved palm branches as if we were queens.DSC_0620

Though these Hands of Love children are dusty, they are loved. Though they are hungry, they are fed—both with sponsored meals and the Living Word of Jesus Christ. DSC_0414 (2)The fragrance of Christ saturated the atmosphere and we breathed it in deeply.

Our afternoon in the bush flew by. We blew bubbles, attended a school performance, taught classes, gave gifts, and loved the children.

DSC_0289We threw pebbles in every direction, touching as many young lives as we could. Later that night, our weary team returned to our Kampala hotel. We entered air-conditioned rooms and ran clean water in pristine showers until it steamed hot. The orange-red water disappeared into the drain, rinsing off the day’s dust. But the fragrance of Christ forever lingers in our hearts.

As you move through your day, what do you leave behind? Does the “scent” of Jesus’ love linger as a result of your interactions? How can you be more intentional about the way you love others to point them to Jesus? Please share a comment below!

Gifted Hands

This year, some very beautiful hands joined together to do some pretty serious pebble throwing.

Wrinkled, 70-year-old hands.

Smooth, 11-year-old hands.

Skilled hands and just-learning-to-sew hands.

View More: http://christinawillsonphotography.pass.us/sewblessedWhen I walked into the church café last week, the 71 dresses and 12 skirts stitched by our church’s Sew Blessed ministry were piled high. Piles and piles of magenta-stripes, rainbow florals, sparkly pink princess prints, and a dazzling array of other fabrics greeted me.

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On the other side of the globe, a group of girls wearing hand-me-down uniforms gathers in a dusty school yard. Their dresses are stained and torn. Their hands are dirty. But they hardly notice because they’ve always been barefoot and a little dusty.

Little do they know, a delivery is on the way. They don’t yet see the ripple effects of nimble fingers ranging from young to mature:  a display of dresses that would make the Queen of Sheba jealous.sew blessed dresses1

Our missionary team will soon check suitcases bulging with dresses for the Hands of Love girls in the Namadhi district of Kampala, Uganda in East Africa. The Sew Blessed women prayed that the dresses will do more than simply clothe the formerly orphaned girls. They tossed pebble-throwing prayers into the heavens asking God to whisper His reminders to the girls:

View More: http://christinawillsonphotography.pass.us/sewblessed“You are not forgotten.”

“You are not an orphan.”

“You have a Father in Heaven.”

“He sees you and He loves you.”

“In fact… He has a gift for you.”

When Sew Blessed began two years ago, the ladies never dreamed their ministry would touch the lives of orphaned children in Uganda. But they faithfully offered up their talent to THE Creatorthe Masterpiece Maker—and partnered with Him to be used for His glory. Last week, they stood in a circle with tear-filled eyes and celebrated how He’d done exactly that: He used a sewing circle to do exceeding abundantly more than they imagined.

camera-2What do you enjoy? Photography? Do you cut hair? Build houses? Take care of animals?scissors-and-combs There is no God-given skill that our Father can’t use to bless another.

How might God use what you love for His kingdom purposes? Are you being nudged to nurture or hone one of your gifts? Pause for a moment and ask Him:

Father God, You are the first Creator. Everything beautiful that I see on this earth was intricately woven together, in Christ, by Your gifted hands. Thank you for the way you have gifted me. Help me to recognize my gifts and see that I have something unique to contribute. Thank you that my “pebble” is completely different than any other. I offer up to you this pebble of                                                           (fill in your gift or skill). Guide me toward the next step to use my skills and talents to serve and bless others.

In Your Holy name,

Amen

Ripples of Salvation

stack of pebblesWelcome! I’m so glad you’ve found Pebble Throwers, where you’ll meet everyday people whose small acts of love ripple into extraordinary things. Pebble Throwers vary in age and are often unaware that they are throwing pebbles. In fact, many don’t realize the tiny change that is taking place when their particular pebble is thrown.

lemonA first grader raises $44 selling lemonade and donates the money to an African orphanage. Her small “pebble” eventually ripples into paying for backpacks filled with school supplies for two African AIDS orphans. To those two children in Uganda, that backpack isn’t just filled with school supplies, it’s overflowing with hope.

I hope this blog will inspire and encourage you. I pray that what is shared might coax you out of your comfort zone for all the best reasons. And please do join the conversation and send me your own pebble throwing stories.

And now for our first story. . .

men-shoesLong before buying shoes was a self-serve venture, before Designer Shoe Warehouse and Pay Less, a pebble thrower named Edward Kimball walked into a shoe store. Kimball, a Sunday School teacher, didn’t need to buy shoes. But he did want to see the 17-year-old clerk, a boy from his class, who worked there.

As they chatted behind the shoe store counter, a pebble was tossed, the Holy Spirit went to work, and the young man—Dwight L. Moody—recognized his need for a savior. He surrendered his life to Christ just a few months later. Though the young man had only four years of formal schooling, Kimball’s pebble eventually rippled into 100 million people receiving Christ through Moody’s evangelism ministry. Those are some big ripples!

Do you ripplesteach? Serve food? Cut hair?

You might consider your work insignificant, but if one interaction can ripple into salvation for 100 million people. . . just think about it. It’s likely that Mr. Kimball had little idea that his conversation with an undereducated teenager would eventually touch so many lives. I don’t believe that’s why he did it. But the fact is that he did it. He showed that young man love and took time to listen to his needs.

pebble hearts

I’d like to challenge you to stop what you’re doing and offer up a pebble to God. Pause long enough to ask Him what tiny act of love He has for you? The ripple effects just might surprise you.

Father God,

Thank you that when You combine my faith and a simple act of love with Your all-surpassing power, anything is possible. Today, I offer up a mustard seed of faith that I have something within me—a small pebble—to offer another. Show me what it is and help me to obey and act. May the ripple effects point others back to you in ways I can’t even imagine.

In Jesus’ name, Amen.

I’d love to hear about any pebbles thrown this week! Did you witness a pebble thrown? Did you throw one? Or were you on the receiving end? Do share!